MANGO – FAT of Summer or FLAVOR of Summer???

Mango is the KING of FRUITS! Would we really title it the King if it made us “fat”? If we call it the King, don’t you think it should have some Royal benefits!

Mango

Now, there is a reason why certain fruits are seasonal – this is because they help us handle or rather deal with the changes the season brings with it. Hence, mangoes are great in summer as they will give a season’s supply of the ‘real’ antioxidants – don’t we just looove our anti-oxidants? In fact, most people are hooked to “green tea”- coz ‘they think’ it is anti-oxidant rich!! (I will leave green tea for another day, now back to my flavor of the season – Mango!!). But Mangoes are really rich in antioxidants and thus keep free radicals at bay!

So the next logical question is – HOW DOES MANGO HELP ME IN SUMMER?

Here is how it is – mango is rich in carotene (Vitamin A) and is high on fibre to help you deal with the scorching heat – mind you it is just the beginning of April, May is not even close and we are already complaining. Vit A is known for its benefit to our eyes, thus the carotene provides nourishment to the eyes to cope with the dazzling burning bright – sun, in spite of us having our Guccis or Ray bans on. This same carotene protects our skin by preventing suntan and sunburn. The fibre provides the necessary roughage for the intestines, which otherwise feel overstrained with dehydration and heat exhaustion, thus preventing constipation. The fibre keeps us feeling fuller longer!

Now you may think – Fine – it is good for my eyes, for my skin and even my tummy – but what about the FAT?

Now – let’s get into the Math – 100 gms Mango v/s 100 gms apple – 100gms ripe mango has 0.4 gms fat  whereas 100gms apple has 0.5 gms fat!!!!

So shouldn’t the apple make us fat! Come on, does it not have 0.1gm MORE fat than Mango!

Yup.. That bursts our bubble! Honestly it’s not really much, but then why is it that we blame the poor King – Mango to make us fat?

It is how we eat the mango – that makes us fat and not the mango itself!

We relish our aam-ras puri, don’t we? Have you ever heard of apple-ras puri? Exactly why we blame the mango and not the apple!!

A mango or any other fruit as a matter of fact, when eaten with a meal or as a dessert immediately on a full stomach (after a meal) alters the pH balance or acidity of the stomach and messes both the glycemic index (the measure of how quickly blood glucose levels or blood sugar rise after eating a particular type of food) and glycemic load (number that estimates how much the food will raise a person’s blood glucose level after eating it) of your meal.

But when a mango is eaten by itself – like any other fruit – say a watermelon or musk melon – now the sugars, the vitamins and the minerals in it are actually much more available to the body than they would be, when it is consumed along with, or right after a meal. Just so you know that for the carotene or Vit A to be absorbed we need fat, because Vit A is a Fat-soluble vitamin. Now here is where the King plays the role – the fat of the mango actually helps in the Vit A absorption – making it ‘not-dependent’ on another food item so that we can get the benefit of Vit A from it – so it is kind of a one-meal-wonder!!

So EAT the Mango you love 🙂

Eat it as soon as you wake up, or as a post-work out meal, and it may just help you get that six pack or the patli kamar (thin waist-line 😉 you have always wanted!

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2 thoughts on “MANGO – FAT of Summer or FLAVOR of Summer???

  1. I like this one on mangoes. The technical stuff is simplified and you have explained why HOW is more important than WHAT !!

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